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AWARDS

THE MAX KELE AWARD


The award is named for Professor Max Kele (1936-1996) of Bradley University, a longtime and active member of the Section and a dedicated patron of the profession of history in the South. Professor Kele earned the Ph.D. from Tulane University and taught at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Bradley University. The award offers a one-year Section and affiliate membership to superior graduate students.

Eligible students include M.A. students, Ph.D. candidates, new Ph.D.s, and post-doctoral fellows nominated by members of the Section or faculty members of Southern colleges and universities. Up to three candidates may be nominated from one university. The Secretary-Treasurer approves the nominations in the limits of available monies.

Nominations are sought from graduate studies directors through the European History Section Newsletter and by the Membership Committee. Graduate directors may contact the chair of the Membership Committee to recommend eligible students no later than April 30.

THE JOHN L. SNELL MEMORIAL PRIZE

The John L. Snell memorial Prize is named for Professor John L. Snell (1923-1972) who was a distinguished scholar and diplomatic historian and the founder of the European History Section. A bomber pilot during World War II, he taught at Tulane University, University of Pennsylvania, and UNC Chapel Hill, where he received the Ph.D. in 1950. It is given annually to the graduate student with the best seminar paper in European history. “European” is defined as encompassing the entire continent, including Russia, from pre-history to the present.

The prize carries a certificate, a cash value of $250, and a one-year complimentary membership in the Section.

The competition is open to graduate students of any member of the Section or of a program at a Southern college or university. Eligible individuals and/or their advisers may contact the chair of the Snell Prize Committee no later than August 1.

THE PARKER-SCHIMITT AWARD

The Parker Schmitt Award was created in 2005 and is named for two outstanding scholars in European History, Professor Harold Parker and Professor Hans Schmitt. Professor Harold Parker (1908-2002) was a specialist of 19th century European History who taught at Duke University from 1939 until his retirement in 1980. Professor Hans A. Schmitt (1921-2006), a founding father of the European History Section, and 20th century German History specialist, taught at the University of Oklahoma, Tulane University, New York University, and the University of Virginia.

The award is given by the European History Section of the Southern Historical Association for the best Ph.D. Dissertation in European history nominated by a member of the Section or a faculty member at a Southern college or university.

The award is given in even years and carries a cash value of $250.

Doctoral theses defended between August 1 of the year the award was previously given and July 31 of the year the award is to be given are eligible for consideration. Criteria for selection include quality and originality of research, new and stimulating interpretations and insights, and literary quality.

Eligible theses may be recommended to the chair of the Parker-Schmitt-Simpson Committee. The person making the recommendation is responsible for ensuring that each committee member receives a copy no later than June 1 of the year the award is given.

THE SIMPSON AWARD


The Simpson Award is named for Professor Amos E. Simpson, who was the Frank A. Godchaux Professor of History at the University of Southwestern Louisiana, which is now the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where he taught and was an administrator from 1956 until his retirement in 1995. The award is given by the European History Section of the Southern Historical Association for the best paper read at the European sessions of the annual SHA meeting. “European” is defined as encompassing the entire continent, including Russia, from pre-history to the present.

The award is given in odd years and carries a cash value of $250.

Papers read at the two annual meetings preceding the year the award is given are eligible for consideration. The papers are gathered by the chair of the Parker-Schmitt-Simpson Committee from past EHS panel chairs and sent to members of the Award Committee who read all submissions and choose the winning paper. Criteria for selection include quality and originality of research, new and stimulating interpretations and insights, and literary quality.

Eligible panelists may contact the chair of the Parker-Schmitt-Simpson Committee. The person making the recommendation is responsible for ensuring that each committee member receives a copy by June 1 of the year the award is given.

THE BAKER-BURTON AWARD

The Baker-Burton Award was created in 2005 and is named for two distinguished scholars, Professor Vaughan Baker Simpson of the University of Louisiana Lafayette, and University of Akron Professor Emerita June K. Burton. The award is given by the European History Section of the Southern Historical Association for the best first book in European history by a member of the Section or a graduate student or a faculty member of a Southern college or university. “European” is defined as encompassing the entire continent, including Russia, from pre-history to the present.

The award is given in odd years and carries a cash value of $250.

Books published between August 1 of the year the award was previously given and July 31 of the year the award is to be given are eligible for consideration. Criteria for selection include quality and originality of research, new and stimulating interpretations and insights, and literary quality.

Eligible books may be recommended to the chair of the Baker-Burton-Smith Committee by their authors or by any member of the Section. The person making the recommendation is responsible for ensuring that each committee member receives a copy no later than August 1 of the year the award is given.

THE SMITH AWARD

The Smith Award, named for Professor Charles E. Smith (1906-1959), who taught ancient, medieval, English History, and Renaissance and Reformation at Louisiana State University and served as Dean from 1934 until his untimely death in 1959. The Award is given by the European History Section of the Southern Historical Association for the best book published in European history by a member of the Section or a faculty member of a Southern college or university, or by a Southern press. “European” is defined as encompassing the entire continent, including Russia, from pre-history to the present.

The award is given in even years and carries a cash value of $250.

Books published between August 1 of the year the award was previously given and July 31 of the year the award is to be given are eligible for consideration. Criteria for selection include quality and originality of research, new and stimulating interpretations and insights, and literary quality.

Eligible books may be recommended to the chair of the Baker-Burton-Smith Committee by their authors or publishers or by any member of the Section. The person making the recommendation is responsible for ensuring that each committee member receives a copy by August 1 of the year the award is given.

THE ENNO E. KRAEHE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD


This special service award was created in 1985 and carries a handsome wall plaque presented at the annual European History Section luncheon. The award may not be given in some years because it recognizes a lifetime of service to the organization. The Executive Committee of the Section places names in nomination where they remain for at least one year, and perhaps for several years, until the year a subsequent committee votes to make the timely award.

The first recipient was Professor Enno E. Kraehe (1921-2008). Professor Kraehe held the Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and taught at the University of Kentucky (1946-1964), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1964-1968), and the University of Virginia (1968-1991), where he was Commonwealth Professor and William W. Corcoran Professor and Professor Emeritus. A diplomatic historian and a specialist of Metternich, Professor Kraehe was a longtime and active member of the Section and a dedicated patron of the profession of history in the South.

European History Section members may submit nominations for the Kraehe award to the Executive Committee prior to the annual meeting.